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Christ and the Abbot Mena CCH's Online Catalog

Grammar Stage History
for 5th Grade: the American World


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5th Grade: the American World

The 17th Century
The 17th century saw the colonizing of the Americas by the Spanish, French, and English, and the first of many clashes with the Native Americans which would continue throughout this century and on into the next.

The 18th Century
The first part of this century is characterized by large scale terrorism, known in American history as the French and Indian Wars, among three nations: the Native Americans, the French, and the English, each of whom used the others for their own ends. The spoil going to the victor was control of the continent. When that conflict finally ended, a combination of philosophical exploration of the rights and responsibilities of both governments and individuals, and rash political decisions by the English crown, sparked the second major conflict of the century: the American Revolution.

The 19th Century
The new American nation had many challenges to face in not only getting itself taken seriously by the millenia-old nations of the Old World, but in working out the details of a new government experiment in a largely unexplored and untamed land, peopled with fiercely independent and sometimes unruly citizens and hostile indigenous tribes. How she rose to the challenge further defined her character.

American World Teacher’s Resources
The American experiment: we have much to be proud of, and much to be ashamed of. It is the old human story played out on a new stage. While Europeans experienced a degree of personal freedom unheard of in the history of the Old World, Africans and Native Americans experienced a degree of submission also unbeknownst to them in previous eras. The struggle to live out Thomas Jefferson’s inspiring words, based on Biblical truth, that “all men are created equal,” still goes on today. Biblical truth informed America’s past; will America survive without Biblical truth informing her future? These essential resources will help the homeschool parent grasp the big picture.



Click to order The VikingsThe Vikings
Elizabeth Janeway

The Vikings is a reprinted edition from Random House’s acclaimed Landmark series. “The story of how Eric the Red and his son Leif sailed to the west and discovered Greenland and the continent of North America is a true story. I have tried to write a true book about their discoveries, but I want to tell you at once that not everything that you will read in this book is fact. All the facts that we know about Eric and Leif and their voyages are here, but in between the facts I have put some fiction. I did this because the fictional parts of the book tell true things about the way people lived and acted and felt in Norway and Iceland and Greenland a thousand years ago.” - author’s foreward. Leif Eriksson discovers North America in ca. 1000.

The 17th Century

The Story of the Thirteen Colonies
H. A. Guerber

This wonderful children’s historical narrative about the founding of our country through the end of the Revolutionary War in 1783 in 84 lessons is the perfect introduction to American history for 5th graders. Guerber writes histories focusing on the people that made it, interweaving a generous dose of Biblical worldview throughout. Every bit as engaging and yet meaty with depth and detail as The Story of the Greeks and The Story of the Romans, The Story of the Thirteen Colonies is being reprinted and will be available in August 2000.


Sweet Land of Liberty
Charles Coffin

Click to order Sweet Land of Liberty If the Guerber book cannot be found this book can take its place. It is the sequel of The Story of Liberty, and picks up where that book leaves off. In the same style, it tells the story of the settlement of this country through the end of the French and Indian War in the 18th century, all in chronological order. It also includes chapters on James I of England, the establishment of French colonies in the New World, the founding of New Netherlands (New York) by the Dutch, Charles I, Oliver Cromwell and the civil war in England, the Quakers, Charles II, King Philip’s War, and Louis Frontenac.


The World of Captain John Smith
Genevieve Foster

Click to order The World of Captain John Smith Like Genevieve Foster’s other books, The World of Captain John Smith presents a look at what was going on in the world during the lifetime of John Smith, leader of the first permanent Virginia settlement of Jamestown. “This book is a story of the world. It is a slice of history measured by the lifetime of Captain John Smith, a small, courageous Englishman who was born in the days of Queen Elizabeth I and whose heart, he said, had been forever ‘set on brave adventure.’ -Horn Book.


The Landing of the Pilgrims
James Daugherty

Click to order The Landing of the Pilgrims Another excellent Landmark reprint by James Daugherty (he also wrote The Magna Charta for the Landmark series). Part One tells the story from 1607-1620 of Will Bradford and the Separatists at Scrooby, their persecution in England, their relocation to Holland, and their decision to emigrate to America. Part Two continues the story from 1620-1621 of their voyage to the New World aboard the Mayflower, their exploration and adventures along the coast, their eventual settlement of Plymouth and their hard first winter there. Part Three concludes the story from 1621-1623 of the departure of the Mayflower and the dangerous and exciting adventures in the development of the colony, their encounters and relations with the local Indians, the arrival of new settlers from England, and finally, what the colony was like twenty years later in 1648. Excellent.


The Witchcraft of Salem Village
Shirley Jackson

Click to order The Witchcraft of Salem Village Stories of magic, superstition, and witchcraft were strictly forbidden in the little town of Salem Village. But a group of young girls ignored those rules, spellbound by the tales told by a woman named Tituba. When questioned about their activities, the terrified girls set off a whirlwind of controversy as they accused townsperson after townsperson of being witches. Author Shirley Jackson examines in careful detail this horrifying true story of accusations, trials, and executions that shook a community to its foundations.


A Coloring Book of the 13 Colonies
Bellerophon Books

Click to order A Coloring Book of the 13 Colonies This coloring book is a bit different than the others. For every two-page spread, the first page is interesting text briefly discussing the settlement of one of the thirteen colonies, with little details and quotes from source material that doesn’t always make it in the history books, while the facing page is a full-page drawing of that colony’s seal, along with an explanation of its symbols, its Latin inscription, etc. It includes directions for coloring, where known, as well as a brief summary of sphragistics, the study of seals. The seals are arranged in chronological order of establishment: the Virginia Company, Plymouth, New Netherland, New Amsterdam, the Council for New England, Massachusetts Bay, New Hampshire, Maryland, Rhode Island, Harvard College, Connecticut, New York City, Carolina, Maine, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and the New England Pine Tree.


G. A. Henty’s American era historical fiction:
By Right of Conquest: or With Cortez in Mexico (1595) paperback edition

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The 18th Century

The Story of the Thirteen Colonies
H. A. Guerber

This wonderful children’s historical narrative about the founding of our country through the end of the Revolutionary War in 1783 in 84 lessons is the perfect introduction to American history for 5th graders. Guerber writes histories focusing on the people that made it, interweaving a generous dose of Biblical worldview throughout. Every bit as engaging and yet meaty with depth and detail as The Story of the Greeks and The Story of the Romans, The Story of the Thirteen Colonies is being reprinted and will be available in August 2000.


Sweet Land of Liberty
Charles Coffin

Click to order Sweet Land of Liberty If the Guerber book cannot be found this book can take its place. It is the sequel of The Story of Liberty, and picks up where that book leaves off. In the same style, it tells the story of the settlement of this country through the end of the French and Indian War in the 18th century, all in chronological order. It also includes chapters on James I of England, the establishment of French colonies in the New World, the founding of New Netherlands (New York) by the Dutch, Charles I, Oliver Cromwell, and the civil war in England, the Quakers, Charles II, King Philip’s War, and Louis Frontenac.


Colonial Craftsmen and the Beginnings of American Industry
Edwin Tunis

Click to order Colonial Craftsmen Edwin Tunis has written marvelous books for children illuminating various periods of American history. In this book, he explains the common occupations and crafts-work found in colonial America. Part One: New World, New Ways, explores British Restrictions, Specialists, Status, The Apprentice System, Journeymen, Masters, Quality and Honesty, and Prices in colonial New Exgland. Part Two: Country Work looks at The Blacksmith, The Cooper and White Cooper, The Housewright, The Sawyers, The Joiner, The Miller, The Tanner and Currier, The Fuller, The Itinerants, The Cat Whipper, The Weaver, The Tailor, The Chandler, and the Tinker. In Part Three: Town Shops, we learn of The Barber and Wigmaker, The Baker, The Apothecary, The Hatter, The Eyeglass Seller, The Cutler, The Tobacconist, and the Hornsmith. Part Four: Bespoke Work explores The Town Blacksmiths, The Locksmith, The Gunsmith, The Whitesmith, The Plumber, The Pewterer, The Coopersmith, The Silversmith, The Builder, The Cabinetmaker, The Wainwright and the Coachmaker, The Bookbinder, The Weaver, The Shoemaker, and the Limner. Part Five: Group Work looks at The Shipwrights, The Chandlers, The Potters, The Block Printers, and the Letterpress Printers. And in Part Six: Manufactories, we learn of The Papermakers, The Glass Blowers, The Braziers, The Clockmakers, and The Ironmasters. This is a very nicely illustrated book on a fascinating subject.


Struggle for a Continent
Albert Marrin

Click to order Struggle for a Continent “For over seventy years (1690-1760), France and Great Britain wrestled for control of North America, pitting the inhabitants of the new world against one another. Three peoples, the Native American “Indians,” French colonists, and British colonists, each with their different wants, needs, and customs, clashed repeatedly until their hatreds exploded in the French and Indian Wars. Colonists allied with Redcoats, Frenchmen fought side by side with Indians, and Britain and France each used the Native Americans for their own ends during years of the most horrifyingly cruel warfare ever waged on the North American continent. In this exciting retelling, Albert Marrin takes the reader from the terrifying midnight raid at Schenectady to Pontiac’s final seige at Detroit. Here, too, we meet those who would become heroes of the American Revolution, including Benjamin Franklin and a young surveyor named George Washington, testing his courage against the French in the Ohio River Valley. Filled with rich and gripping detail, Struggle for a Continent brings each stage of the wars into sharp focus, vividly recreating the years of ruthless fighting that paved the way for another conflict that began in 1776--the American Revolution.” -Book Jacket. A clear and fascinating accurate portrayal of the Indians, the French, and the British, and their relationships from 1690 to 1760.
Out of print. Search AddAll.com via an author search using ‘albert marrin,’ and a title search using ‘struggle for a continent.’


George Washington’s World
Genevieve Foster

Click to order George Washington’s World Like the other books by Genevieve Foster, George Washington’s World looks at the history of the world during the slice of Washington’s lifetime. When he was a boy, we meet Daniel Boone and other future heroes of this country as children, Pontiac, the Asante of Africa, Spain and the Pueblos of New Mexico, Frederick, King of Prussia, Catherine the Great, Voltaire, and more; when he was a young man and a soldier, we meet India and the European traders, and Goethe; when George was a farmer we sail the South Seas with Captain Cook, meet Lavoisier, Layfayette, the Corsairs of Algiers, the Turkish Empire, Poland, and more; when he was the general of the American army during the Revolution, we not only learn of that conflict, but meet Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI, and learn what is happening of import in Spain, Holland, and China; and so on throughout his life.


War for Independence
Albert Marrin

Click to order War for Independence Albert Marrin recreates the important events of the time from the Boston Massacre to Washington’s farewell to his troops. There are the stories of the Boston Tea Party, Paul Revere’s midnight ride and the Minutemen of Lexington and Concord, the disastrous defeat of Long Island, the winter at Valley Forge, the victories of Trenton, Saratoga, and Yorktown, and more. It is also about the ideas and individuals behind the world’s first successful rebellion: Thomas Paine, George Washington, Samuel and John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and more. Illustrated with well chosen historical media and clear maps, it is an outstanding one-volume narrative of the whole history of the Revolution.


The American Revolution
Bruce Bliven, Jr.

Click to order The American Revolution The war started on April 19, 1775, when the minutemen of Lexington and Concord fired on the British Redcoats from Boston. But in the hearts and minds of the American people, it was the revolution that was begun, as John Adams said, fifteen years before a drop of blood was shed. This Landmark book reprint contains the complete story of both the war and the revolution that covered a quarter of a century from 1760-1783. Along with the causes and the battlefield narrative of the war, the events are viewed, as they should be, within the larger framework of European history. Twenty chapters tell about the Young King that Ends a Great War, Quarrels over Money, Americans Boycott British Goods, Boston: a Massacre and a Tea Party, the First Continental Congress, Lexington and Concord, Bunker Hill, the Americans Attack Canada, the Americans Declare Independence, Washington Crosses the Delaware, Brandywine and Germantown, Saratoga, Valley Forge, Battle of Monmouth, British Conquer in the South, America’s Most Famous Traitor, King’s Mountain and Cowpens, Nathaniel Greene, Yorktown, and the War’s End.


The U.S. Constitution for Everyone
Mort Gerberg

Click to order U.S. Constitution for Everyone This slim book presents the text of the Constitution, explains its fundamentals, and traces the events leading up to its adoption in 1788. It is a clear, easy-to-read introduction to America’s founding document. A page of the Constitution’s actual text faces a page of explanation and information in such a way that both young and old can develop a clear understanding of the Constitution. It also includes the text of all 27 Constitutional amendments.

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The 19th Century

The Story of the Great Republic
H. A. Guerber

This wonderful children’s historical narrative about the beginning of the United States after the War for Independence (1783) through Roosevelt’s administration at the turn of the century in 77 lessons is the perfect continuation of American history for 5th graders. Guerber writes histories focusing on the people that made it, interweaving a generous dose of Biblical worldview throughout. Every bit as engaging and yet meaty with depth and detail as The Story of the Greeks and The Story of the Romans, The Story of the Great Republic is being reprinted and will be available in August 2000.


The Incredible Journey of Lewis and Clark
Rhoda Blumberg

Click to order The Incredible Journey of Lewis and Clark In 1804, the land west of the Mississippi was a vast mystery, thought to be full of monsters and giants. Thomas Jefferson had just acquired the vast Louisiana Territory from Napoleon, who needed some quick cash to finance his war in Europe. The Louisiana Territory included all the land west of the Mississippi drained by that great river and her tributaries. No one had ever explored the whole area before, something that the third president was keen on rectifying. He chose Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to head the dangerous and rugged expedition. While they didn’t find giants, their odyssey of scientific discovery is unequaled in American history. Lavishly illustrated, Rhoda Blumberg uses excerpts from their journals and other historical information to recreate this most exciting of American journeys for her readers. An ALA Notable Book; School Library Journal Best Book of the Year; and Golden Kite Award book.


Mill
David Macaulay

Click to order Mill “In Mill, a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year, David Macaulay pays tribute to the historically important mills of 19th-century New England. Using close-up pen-and-ink illustrations, Macaulay thoroughly explains the Yankee ingenuity that went into the elaborate process of running machines that were generated by the flow of water. In the case of this cotton mill in the imaginary town of Wicksbridge, Macaulay also demonstrates how important the mill was to a community’s economic and social viability. Macaulay tracks the mill’s history, expertly explaining how all its new fixtures and materials reflect the political and industrial changes in the country. For example, in 1852 the owner sides with his abolitionist wife and shuns the use of “Negro cloth,” inexpensive cloth made from slave-picked cotton. Instead he decides to start producing multi-colored, finer fabrics--a decision that leads to the expansion of the mill and the introduction of the steam engine. This finely woven tale is filled with technical intricacies and intriguing historical details. But ultimately, Mill is generated by the human story that led to the building of New England’s cotton mills--as well as their eventual demise.”


1812: the War Nobody Won
Albert Marrin

Click to order 1812 Britain relunctantly gave up possession of the colonies in the United States after the Treaty of Paris was signed in 1783. That didn’t change the feeling that the American colonies, and American citizens, still belonged to Britain. Taking advantage of the years of instability while the new goverment was being framed and put into effect, Britain increasingly provoked America in various ways. The straw that broke the camel’s back was her unceasing impressment of American seamen in the cruel and inhumane British Royal Navy. As soon as the new country could build up enough of a navy to oppose the Queen of the Seas, war was declared. This is the story of that conflict: what led up to it, what happened, who the players were, and what were the consequences. During the course of the war, the British army marched on Washington and burned it to the ground--Mrs. Dolly Madison, the First Lady, barely escaped capture as she saw to the safety of our national documents and the famous portrait of George Washington, which she refused to leave behind; and Francis Scott Key, imprisoned on a British ship, wrote the Star-Spangled Banner.


The Francis Parkman Reader
Francis Parkman, Samuel Eliot Morison, editor

Click to order The Francis Parkman Reader Francis Parkman was the greatest American historian of the 19th century. His acclaimed account of the Conspiracy of Pontiac was an Everyman’s Library staple, and his narratives of the history of the Oregon Trail were required reading by 19th century schoolchildren in this country, who eagerly devoured them. Parkman’s histories read like novels, only every phrase, every description, is an exact recording of the events he eye-witnessed or painstakingly pulled together from source material. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once said to a companion, “By the way, talking of history, have you read Parkman’s works? He was, I think, among the greatest of the historians, and yet one seldom hears his name.” The more famous American historian of the 19th century, John Fiske, while lecturing at University College in England on “America’s Place in History,” found enthusiastic agreement among his hearers when mentioning Irving, Bancroft, Ticknor, Prescott, Kirk, and Motley, but when speaking of Francis Parkman his remarks were received with bewilderment. (Parkman just happened to be in the audience that day, unbeknown to Fiske.) The best works of this outstanding but forgotten historian are happily in print again in The Francis Parkman Reader.


The California Gold Rush
May McNeer

Click to order The California Gold Rush On January 24, 1848, James Marshall discovered a small nugget of gold in a stream near Sutter’s Mill, California. Though he tried to keep it a secret, word spread through the country like wildfire. Before the year was out, the great American gold rush had begun. This true-life adventure story recreates the days when young and old went west with pick and shovel in the hope of finding riches. While true to the factual accounts of the California gold fields, the text is lively and filled with details on the lives of the ordinary yet fascinating people, colorful anecdotes of life in the mining camps, and more.


Daily Life on a Southern Plantation
Paul Erickson

Click to order Daily Life on a Southern Plantation In this handsome book, you will meet the Hendersons, who live on a Southern plantation with their children in 1853. You’ll also meet Daddy Major, Rosena, Scipio, and Cicero, slaves who work in the Big House and in the cotton fields. Full-color photographs of interiors, clothing, and objects, plus artwork and oral history, document a typical day on a plantation. You will see the stately bedrooms and dining room of the plantation house, as well as the simple slave quarters and cabins. Inside the Big House, morning chores are done and the children readied for school (or play); in the kitchen house, food is cooked and bread is baked; and in the sugar house, cane is crushed. Readers will learn about mealtimes, leisure hours, doctors and disease, and bedtimes. You’ll also learn about attitudes toward slavery, slave meetings in the woods, and much more in this unique visit to a restored Southern plantation in New Iberia, Louisiana.


Commander in Chief: Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War
Albert Marrin

Click to order Commander in Chief Although this is a biography of Lincoln and a history of the Civil War, it is much more than either of those. It is a portrait of Lincoln that makes our sixteenth president accessible to young readers as a human being, rather than as a historic icon or paragon of virtue. The author, renowned for his award-winning books on great leaders, shows how a principled but imperfect man -- full of intelligence but also of sorrow, logical and determined, but also cautious and prejudiced, grew under the pressure of personal tragedy and national crisis to become our greatest president. The book is written in a quick-flowing, engaging style, detailed but easy to read. The author effortlessly uses eyewitness accounts--letters, speeches, diaries, newspapers, poems, songs, memoirs--to create setting, to show personality, political climate, to give voice to the attitudes and hopes of everyday Americans. The treatment of slavery is especially vivid. All the important events of the war are here, but the emphasis is on people, personalities, human feelings and behavior, resulting in another excellent Marrin history.


Albert Marrin’s American era histories
Albert Marrin

Click to order Virginia’s General Albert Marrin, chairman of the history department at Yeshiva University, has written a number of excellent histories and biographies for children and young adults, spiced with extensively footnoted primary sources and illustrations from authentic historical media. Marrin has that rare quality that distinguishes great historians from good ones: objectivity and moral strength, and the ability to convey accurate historical research with literary style and high-level interest. Virginia’s General: Robert E. Lee and the Civil War retells the story of the conflict from the southern viewpoint, painting a vivid portrait of the great general and American hero. In Unconditional Surrender: U. S. Grant and the Civil War, he does the same with General Grant as his subject. Reading all three books on Lincoln, Lee, and Grant give a thorough overview of not only the history of the Civil War, but what the conflict was about from both the Northern and Southern viewpoint. Empires Lost and Won: the Spanish Heritage in the Southwest, is a “vivid narrative ... across three centuries of struggle for control of the American Southwest. ... from the cruel conquistadors to ... the battles between the U.S. and Mexico’s General Santa Anna ... a welcome improvement over dry textbook accounts of the Alamo and the Mexican War.” The Mexican War was fought prior to the Civil War. Cowboys, Indians, and Gunfighters: the Story of the Cattle Kingdom discusses the history of the North American West from the arrival of the first cattle from Spain in 1521, and includes the battle for Texas’ independence, and the stories of such famous Westerners as Wyatt Earp, Wild Bill Hickock, and others.


G. A. Henty’s American era historical fiction:
With Lee in Virginia: A Story of the American Civil War (1860’s) paperback edition
In the Heart of the Rockies: A Story of Adventure in Colorado (1860)
A Tale of the Western Plains (1880’s)


American Literature: The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper, The Complete Tales of Washington Irving, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Selected Poems edited by Laurence Buell, American Tall Tales by Adrien Stoutenburg, The Complete Tales of Uncle Remus by Joel Chandler Harris, and Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain, from 5th Grade Literature selections

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American World Teacher’s Resources

The Penguin Atlas of North American History
Colin McEvedy

Click to order the Penguin Atlas of North American History The Penguin Atlas of North American History includes nicely readable maps of all periods of American history to 1870, or the period of Reconstruction after the Civil War. From that time on the exploration of North America was close to being complete, and the state lines were in place. Colin McEvedy also includes, along with each map, a brief essay on the events and time period being portrayed.


History of the United States
Henry William Elson

History of the United States In one volume, this history of the United States covers the major events and persons of our nation from Christopher Columbus to the end of the Second World War. Elson’s history is unique among surveys, in that it falls “between the elaborate works, which are beyond the reach of most busy people, and the condensed school histories, which are emasculated of all literary style through the necessity of crowding so many facts into small space.” He successfully combined the science of historical research with the art of historical composition, as other great historians also have done. It is a narrative history, telling the stories of the people and the times. I have found it very helpful for filling in the holes in my own knowledge of American history, and for including details and perspective about persons and events out of vogue with many modern historians, as this work was originally published in 1904, and continuously reprinted until after World War II.
Out of print. Search AddAll.com via an author search using ‘elson,’ and a title search using ‘history of the united states.’


The Oxford History of the American People
Samuel Eliot Morison

Click to order the Oxford History of the American People, volume 1 Published by Penguin, the publisher of accessible editions of the works of ancient, classical, and medieval authors, the Oxford History of the American People is written by the Pulitzer Prize-winning American historian, Samuel Eliot Morison. In three volumes, he covers the complete history of North America, from prehistory to the death of John F. Kennedy in an interesting and easy-to-read narrative style. Volume One covers Prehistory to 1789 and the writing of the Constitution of the United States, Volume Two covers 1789 through reconstruction at the end of the Civil War, and Volume Three covers 1869 through the death of John F. Kennedy in 1963.


America’s Christian History: the Untold Story
Gary DeMar

Click to order America’s Christian History: the Untold Story “From the founding of the colonies to the declaration of the Supreme Court, America’s heritage is built upon the principles of the Christian religion. And yet the secularists are dismantling this foundation brick by brick, attempting to deny the very core of our national life. This book lays out the essence of the Christian America debate ... providing solid proof that Christianity gave this country its life and its character.” Did you know that ‘America is a Christian nation’ has been inscribed into law by the United States Supreme Court? That the record of American history, its founders, and two centuries of its presidents and governors have echoed that inscription? The Christian history of America, rewritten by modern secularism, is brought into clear view again by Gary DeMar in The Untold Story.


The Roots of American Order
Russell Kirk

Click to order the Roots of American Order This book is not a typical history of the United States. Instead, it is a book on the history of the ideas and the philosophy of that made the United States the country it is. It is a book on the history of the individual, moral, legal, and societal order of Western Civilization, and how American society was built and grew on that order. It covers in scope the time period from Moses and the giving of the Law, through the Civil War. Chapters include Order, the First Need of All; The Law and the Prophets; Glory and Ruin: the Greek World; Virtue and Power: the Roman Tension; the Genius of Christianity; the Light of the Middle Ages; the Reformer’s Drum; the Constitution of Church and State; Salutary Neglect: the Colonial Order; Eighteenth-Century Intellects; Declaration and Constitution; and Contending Against American Disorder.


Click to order The Francis Parkman ReaderThe Francis Parkman Reader
Francis Parkman, Samuel Eliot Morison, editor

Francis Parkman was the greatest American historian of the 19th century. His acclaimed account of the Conspiracy of Pontiac was an Everyman’s Library staple, and his narratives of the history of the Oregon Trail were required reading by 19th century schoolchildren in this country, who eagerly devoured them. Parkman’s histories read like novels, only every phrase, every description, is an exact recording of the events he eye-witnessed or painstakingly pulled together from source material. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle once said to a companion, “By the way, talking of history, have you read Parkman’s works? He was, I think, among the greatest of the historians, and yet one seldom hears his name.” The more famous American historian of the 19th century, John Fiske, while lecturing at University College in England on “America’s Place in History,” found enthusiastic agreement among his hearers when mentioning Irving, Bancroft, Ticknor, Prescott, Kirk, and Motley, but when speaking of Francis Parkman his remarks were received with bewilderment. (Parkman just happened to be in the audience that day, unbeknown to Fiske.) The best works of this outstanding but forgotten historian are happily in print again in The Francis Parkman Reader.

The Causes of the Civil War
Kenneth M. Stampp

Click to order the Causes of the Civil War Was the Civil War unavoidable? Did economic interests, political agitation, and the cultural differences between North and South do more to bring it about than the issue of slavery? Kenneth Stampp presents the full range of continuing debate on the issues and events leading up to America’s bloodiest conflict, skilfully integrating the conclusions of historians with the writings of the men who were part of the struggle. A classic since its introduction in 1959, this sourcebook contains eighty-seven selections drawn from original sources of the period, such as newspaper editorials and speeches by public figures, plus essays by historians from the post-Civil War period up to the present. Chapters cover issues such as “Slave Power” and “Black Republicans”, State Rights and Nationalism, Economic Sectionalism, Slavery, Majority Rule and Minority Rights, and the Conflict of Cultures. Newspaper editorials from the Trenton Gazette, the New Orleans Daily Crescent, the Philadelphia Public Ledger, the Boston Post, the New York Herald, the Charleston Mercury, and the Chicago Tribune, to name a few, stand side by side with speeches and essays by John C. Calhoun, Jefferson Davis, Alexander H. Stephens, Stephen Douglas, James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln, William H. Seward, and Frederick Douglass, to name a few.


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